Post-Glass post

[Photo taken while walking in the Missouri State campus wearing Glass] Sometimes I get a great idea and don’t have time to write about it at that moment. This is one of those times. It’s probably no secret that I was part of the Google Glass beta and that I used that time fairly purposely, […]

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Photographer’s rights

Living so close to St. Louis, the outrageous denial of reporters’ right to photograph and record in public shocked me to the core. As a participant in Project 365, I think about what is permissible and what is not as a photographer and a videographer. As one who wears Google Glass, I feel I am […]

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Future tech now, part 2: People be crazy

If yesterday’s post could have been called “excited about new things” or “anticipation,” this one might be “people be crazy” or whatyou looking’ at Willis?” I caught a teaser on the local news about a local restaurant that is banning Google Glass use and that brought the whole technophobia issue home for me. I still […]

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Academics need bandwidth too

Geoffrey Sauer on Eserver writes an excellent post, Net Neutrality and the Digital Humanities, that details why the recent┬ádecision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia to prevent the FCC from enforcing “net neutality” policies is a threat to more than our Netflix or YouTube access. Here is another view, from […]

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Inattention in the Classroom and The Cult of Multitasking

On reading my previous post on laptops and inattention in the classroom, I was struck by a nagging feeling that I was missing something that absolutely needed to be said. It came to me when I reviewed what I do when stuck in meetings or presentations where I don’t have a stake in the outcome […]

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It’s not the laptops, it’s the inattention.

I allow laptops in my classes, and really, would have a hard time justifying a different stance. Besides, with the cost of books these days, I find that especially in lit courses, students are taking advantage of free public domain ebooks for the classics, something they can do on a laptop if they don’t have […]

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What it looks like

This is what grading papers with an iPad looks like. I ‘m using iAnnotate to comment on and assess two sections’ worth of 8-10 page papers. I did the poetry portfolios in paper, but I’m thinking of converting that process also. What is keeping me from doing that is tech literacy expectations. Undergrads here are […]

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