Sharing a recipe with Google Glass

One of the available categories of Glassware is Glass software that acts as recipe social media, one that allows you and many other people to make a recipe archive. That in itself is not new, but two of those archives, allthecooks and KitchMe also allow you to search and then run through the recipe using Glass, either with screened text instructions, audible instructions, or both. You can also finally share Aunt Susie’s recipe via YouTube, only this time with hands-on shots of your hands while you are making the recipe. In the video below, Jaime Oliver uses Glass while making a salad to give the close-up technique shots. The video itself though, despite the use of a full-length mirror at times, is still heavily produced and edited, with normal back and forth motion between food shots and head/body shots of Oliver, who I just realized, has a super-villlain name (All first name names, even his surname).

Another piece of artifice–there is a real reason why Oliver keeps the eyeshade on while he slices and dices. It was not to lend a hint of danger to the knife work. No, someone must have let hime see himself in that full-length mirror wearing Glass before they started filming and he had a very normal reaction. Here’s my attempt at his interior voice at that moment:

*Alright. here we are. Google Glass–how cool is that? I’lll show them I’m still Mr. Coolness on ice–oh, good one there. Now let’s just check—oh, dear. We can’t have that, can we?* “You there! Bring me the eyeshade.” *Ah, that’s better.*

Yes, Jaime Oliver discovered the transformative power of Glass, at least Glass without prescription frames. Wearing just the apparatus makes anyone look like the king or queen of dork, and he wasn’t having any of that. Here’s the video, which is worth watching for how he makes his own salad dressing using a jam jar:

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Author of the poetry collection The Tethered Ground and Professor of English at Missouri State University. Contact me for readings or for workshops on writing/publishing and on teaching writing online.

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