Pick me!

i just signed up to be an Explorer for Google Glass, me and a gazillion other people. The form had a drop-down menu of choices for the reason why I wanted Google Glass, but hey! I'm a writer, so I want another chance with more words. If Google is as all-knowing and all-seeing as some … Continue reading Pick me!

Here’s to the idea that “We won’t get fooled again”

For my Writing I students and others interested in how persuasion should work in academic writing, this week brings a fresh look at the logical fallacy by Information is Beautiful (found through veteran rhetorician Machina Memorialis). What they are calling "rhetological fallacies" are sorted with each category having its own color, all the easier to … Continue reading Here’s to the idea that “We won’t get fooled again”

Evaluating Sources Part Two: The Hierarchy of Cheese

The somewhat odd title for this post connects to a Writing I example I often use for describing the difference between a good source and a bad source when doing sourced writing for academia (university writing, writing for publication...). In this post, I am going to extend this small, mildly humorous example to ridiculous lengths. … Continue reading Evaluating Sources Part Two: The Hierarchy of Cheese

And FIrst Is Ethos

The Chronicle blog ProfHacker today has a column that shows its rhetorical roots--it is about how to persuade. It goes for Aristotelian-style and it makes sure that the order that Aristotle lists the trivium denotes importance. Instead of privileging logos, ethos is presented as the foundation of persuasion. I'm going to keep this link for … Continue reading And FIrst Is Ethos